Whenever we’re stuck in awkward silence with nothing to say, we can always turn to the weather as a “get out of jail” card.

OK. Let’s look at the classic conversational cliché: the weather.

It’s true, though, isn’t it?

Whenever we’re stuck in awkward silence with nothing to say, we can always turn to the weather as a “get out of jail” card in the game of “what on Earth will I say to this person now?”

And, sure, our students can talk about the weather, right?

I mean – they learned this stuff ages ago.

But there’s more to the weather than just saying “It’s hot,” “It’s sunny,” “It’s raining” and “Why is it raining frogs now?”

As language learners get more confident and develop stronger language and communication skills, talking about the weather is something they’re going to want to revisit in order to … well … in order to do it better.

There’s a big difference between “My town is cold” and “Temperatures in my hometown drop to below – 20 sometimes creating some seriously icy driving conditions.”


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